• Big Data
    Interagency Working Group
    (BD IWG)

    The Big Data Interagency Working Group (BD IWG) works to facilitate and further the goals of the White House Big Data R&D Initiative.

    BigData
  • Cyber Physical Systems Interagency Working Group (CPS IWG)

    The CPS IWG is to coordinate programs, budgets, and policy recommendations for Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) research and development (R&D).

    CPS
  • Cyber Security and Information Assurance Interagency Working Group (CSIA IWG)

    Cyber Security and Information Assurance (CSIA) Interagency Working Group coordinates the activities of the CSIA Program Component Area.

    CSIA
  • Health IT R&D
    Interagency Working Group

    The Health Information Technology Research and Development Interagency Working Group coordinates programs, budgets and policy recommendations for Health IT R&D.

    healthitrd
  • Human Computer Interaction & Information Management Interagency Working Group (HCI&IM IWG)

    HCI&IM focuses on information interaction, integration, and management research to develop and measure the performance of new technologies.

    hciim
  • High Confidence Software & Systems Interagency Working Group (HCSS IWG)

    HCSS R&D supports development of scientific foundations and enabling software and hardware technologies for the engineering, verification and validation, assurance, and certification of complex, networked, distributed computing systems and cyber-physical systems (CPS).

    hcss
  • High End Computing Interagency Working Group (HEC IWG)

    The HEC IWG coordinates the activities of the High End Computing (HEC) Infrastructure and Applications (I&A) and HEC Research and Development (R&D) Program Component Areas (PCAs).

    hec
  • Large Scale Networking Interagency Working Group
    (LSN IWG)

    LSN members coordinate Federal agency networking R&D in leading-edge networking technologies, services, and enhanced performance.

    lsn
  • Software Productivity, Sustainability, and Quality Interagency Working Group (SPSQ IWG)

    The purpose of the SPSQ IWG is to coordinate the R&D efforts across agencies that transform the frontiers of software science and engineering and to identify R&D areas in need of development that span the science and the technology of software creation and sustainment.

    sdp
  • Video and Image Analytics
    Interagency Working Group (VIA IWG)

    Formed to ensure and maximize successful coordination and collaboration across the Federal government in the important and growing area of video and image analytics

    VIA CG
  • Wireless Spectrum Research and Development Interagency Working Group (WSRD IWG)

    The Wireless Spectrum R&D (WSRD) Interagency Working Group (IWG) has been formed to coordinate spectrum-related research and development activities across the Federal government.

    WSRD

SPSQ

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  • Software Productivity, Sustainability, and Quality (SPSQ IWG)

    The purpose of the SPSQ IWG is to coordinate the R&D efforts across agencies that transform the frontiers of software science and engineering and to identify R&D areas in need of development that span the science and the technology of software creation and sustainment.

    Software Productivity, Sustainability, and Quality (SPSQ IWG)

NITRD -> NITRD Groups -> SPSQ IWG

Software Productivity, Sustainability, and Quality (SPSQ)
Interagency Working Group (IWG)





Overview

The purpose of the SPSQ IWG is to coordinate the R&D efforts across agencies that transform the frontiers of software science and engineering and to identify R&D areas in need of development that span the science and the technology of software creation and sustainment. The core SPSQ R&D activities are software productivity, software quality, software cost, software economics, responsiveness to change, and sustainability. The R&D agenda coordinated by this IWG is to identify and foster research toward improved software development methods and environments. The drivers of this research agenda include information technology, industrial production, cyber security, computational science and engineering, evolving areas - such as the Internet of Things (IOT), and highly complex, interconnected software-intensive systems.

The primary SPSQ IWG objective is to accelerate progress in the science and technology of software production to deliver orders of magnitude improvement in software defect rates and in the time and cost of creating and sustaining software to drive innovation to the strategic advantage of the United States and develop the next-generation software-intensive systems. Another SPSQ IWG objective is to coordinate the R&D efforts across agencies and identify R&D areas in need of development that span the science and the technology of software creation and sustainment.


See the SPSQ IWG Charter for more information.

Co-Chairs

Dr. Ram D. Sriram

Ram D. Sriram, Ph.D.
Chief, Software and Systems Division
Information Technology Laboratory
National Institute of Standards and Technology
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8260
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8260
Tel: (301) 975-3507

Sol Greenspan, Ph.D.
Program Director, CISE/CCF
National Science Foundation
4201 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1108
Arlington, VA 22230
Tel: (703) 292-8910

James Kirby
Software Engineering Researcher
Naval Research Laboratory
Center for High Assurance Computer Systems
Naval Research Laboratory
Tel: (202) 767-3107




Events Calendar

Calendar Address - ical, html





Workshops/Meetings/Presentations

James Kirby Jr. with participation by David Weiss
US Naval Research Laboratory
Center for High Assurance Computer Systems



An inter-agency workshop sponsored by the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) / Software Design and Productivity (SDP) Coordinating Group (CG). For more information please visit https://www.nitrd.gov/csessp/



Dr. Brenda Bannan
Division of Learning Technologies
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University



Dr. Stuart Faulk, University of Oregon
Abstract: Hardware improvements currently do little to increase real productivity in scientific computing. Research shows that the dominant barriers to productivity improvement are now in the software process. However, scientific programmers resist adopting modern software engineering technologies, believing that conventional software engineering practices do not address the unique requirements of scientific computing. Progress will require collaboration. For the software engineering community this means reformulating principles, methods, and tools to fit the needs and constraints of scientific computing. This talk will identify areas where collaborative research and development are most likely to yield results.



Dr. Douglas C. Schmidt